An event that happened in a Boston laboratory 146 years ago today turned out to be a life-changing moment in technology that has had an effect on communication ever since. It was on this day in 1876 when Alexander Graham Bell talked to his assistant Thomas Watson over a 100-foot wire and had the first telephone conversation in history.
It was a brief statement by Bell to his assistant according to onthisday.com. Bell simply said, “Mr. Watson come here; I want you.” According to the article Bell wrote in his journal that day: “To my delight, he came and declared that he had heard and understood what I said.”

In a Boston Lab, “Mr. Watson come here; I want you.”

It is reported in the onthisday.com article that the two switched places and after Watson read a passage from a book over the device Bell wrote in his journal “It was certainly the case that articulate sounds proceeded from the speaker. The effect was loud but indistinct and muffled.”

It was the 1st telephone communication 146 years ago on this day in Boston

Bell was granted a US patent in 1876 for a device that produced clearly intelligible replication of a human voice to another device according to Wikipedia. According to Wiki Bell placed the first New York to Chicago telephone call in 1982 and the technology has taken off ever since. So, when you make a call today on your smartphone think back 146 years ago today when the very first words were spoken at one end and heard in another.

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