As someone who works in the radio industry and doesn't make a whole lot of money, I can definitely say I'm very thankful for dollar stores. I'm sure I'm not alone in my way of thinking, either.

Think about it. They're convenient. Nowadays, most cities have at least one, sometimes two or three, or more dollar stores. And if your city or town doesn't have one, chances are pretty good that the closest one is not too far of a drive.

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Obviously, the big benefit of dollar stores is saving mucho bucks on items that would be more expensive elsewhere. That certainly benefits everyone but it's especially beneficial for low-income communities and neighborhoods.

However, being a benefit for the community does not give store owners and managers license to mistreat their employees. Thankfully, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey is on the Crusader Warpath once again!

According to a media statement from Mass.gov, Family Dollar, a subsidiary of Dollar Tree Stores, Inc., has been hit with a hefty fine for violations of Massachusetts' meal break laws.

Attorney General Maura Healey announced recently that they were slapped with a fine of $1.5 million for more than 3,900 meal break violations affecting over 600 employees across 100 Family Dollar locations in Massachusetts.

Family Dollar was cited twice by the AG's Office for failing to provide employees who worked more than six hours in a single day at least a half-hour break to grab something to eat. And that will not be tolerated as Healey explained in the statement:

Workers give us their time, energy, and efforts to keep businesses running and our economy afloat. These citations should send a message to all companies that they need to do right by their employees and provide meal breaks consistent with the law.

Nice way of keeping an eye on things, Crusader Healey. For more on the story, visit Mass.gov's website here.

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