According to a new survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more people are experiencing symptoms of anxiety and depression as the world continues to grapple with the coronavirus pandemic.

From a story reported on by Western Mass News, the latest statistics from the CDC show an increase in isolation, substance use, and suicidal thoughts.

COVID-19 has been debilitating and many cases, deadly to hundreds of thousands of people across the globe, but its impact is more than physical.

Kimberley Lee, vice president of resource developing and branding at the Mental Health Association Inc. in Springfield, said, "Our mental health colleagues are reporting increased levels of stress and anxiety."

Lee said they're seeing more people experiencing signs of depression, anxiety, substance use disorders, and suicidal thoughts here in western Mass. as people continue to practice social distancing, isolating themselves.

This week is suicide prevention week, and ahead of September, National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, the CDC surveyed over 5,000 adults in June. Their latest statistics, revealing that 40-percent of Americans reported experiencing mental or behavioral challenges as a result of COVID-19.

In the survey, 11-percent reported they seriously considered suicide in 30 days. Lee said this year's suicide awareness is that much more important amid the pandemic, which is why they're encouraging the community to talk about suicide.

Lee explained, "We refer to it as ASR, which [stands for] asks, support, and respond."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some of the warning signs of suicide include being isolated, feeling like a burden, and increased substance abuse.

If you, or someone you know, is experiencing suicidal thoughts, please call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. The number is 1(800)-273-8255.

For the full story, visit Western Mass News' website here.

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