Hey, have you gotten an Apple iPhone update lately? If you have, you may have noticed an update to your list of emojis.

These emoji additions are part of the iOS 15.4 update for the cell phone and will feature 37 brand new emojis along with variations and changes to already existing emojis. Some of those new emojis are already causing angry debates on social media.

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Some of the new emojis include a pregnant man, a pregnant person, a melting face, biting lips, a saluting hand, gender-inclusive alternatives to the prince and princess emojis, and a person with a crown.

Emojipedia showcased on Twitter recently what the emojis will look like on Apple devices. When the new emojis were first announced last September, Jane Solomon, Emojipedia's senior emoji lexicographer, explains they can be used "for representation by trans men, non-binary people, or women with short hair."

Some of the other new emoji additions include a mirror ball, a chest x-ray, multi-racial handshakes, a dotted-line face, a hand over mouth face, and a wide-eyed face covered by hands but with the eyes peeking through its fingers.

However, it appears that three of the new additions are causing some online drama: the pregnant man emoji, the gender-neutral pregnant person emoji, and the crown-wearing emoji.

Many folks on Twitter have accused the emoji creators of going too far, saying that the new emojis erase biological traits that make women different from men and also that it dehumanizes women.

Meanwhile, those in favor of the new emojis say that they may be used to represent trans men, non-binary people, and other groups. Rest assured, the debate will rage on, probably until the next batch of emojis are announced.

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